Wednesday, March 15, 2017

"Cherished in the Heart of Hearts"


I recently discovered new information on the Major General C. F. Smith's death. The following editorial appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer on Tuesday, May 2, 1862.
 
Major General Charles Ferguson Smith
[Editorial]
 Honor to the Memory of General C. F. Smith.
A telegraphic dispatch from Larz Anderson, Esq., of Cincinnati to William L. Mactier of the city announces the arrival in the former place of the remains of the lamented Major General Charles F. Smith, on their way to Philadelphia for internment. It is expected that the body will reach our city by Sunday next.
There can be no more fitting occasion for public action than this, for the memory of the real hero of Fort Donelson - gallant gentleman and model soldier as he was  - is cherished in the heart of hearts of every loyal resident of his native city. 
Arrival of the Body of General Smith. 
The body of General Charles F. Smith is expected to arrive in this city on Sunday next. It was yesterday at Cincinnati. The following dispatch was received by William L. Mactier, Esq.:
Cincinnati, April 30, 1862. -
To William L. Mactier, Esq., Philadelphia: General Smith's body has just arrived. Its detention here being unexpected, there could be no public reception. It rests at my house, subject to further directions.
Larz Anderson. 
The wife of General Smith, immediately upon the announcement of his serious illness at the seat of war in the West, started from New York for Tennessee. Before she reached Cincinnati, however, General Robert Anderson telegraphed to Mr. Larz Anderson to stop her at the last-named city, and suggest her return to the East, her husband having expired. She acted accordingly, and is now in Philadelphia in company with two sisters of the late General Smith, viz: Mrs. Swan, wife of the navy agent at Newport, R.I., and Mrs. Jeffers. The widow and relatives await the arrival of the corpse at the house of Mr. Mactier.
 The remains will probably lay in state in Independence Hall on Monday next should Councils so direct.
The officers of Laurel Hill Cemetery contemplate offering a lot of ground either to the city or to the family.[1]
 General Smith's funeral was held on May 7, 1862 with military honors.  
LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

THE FUNERAL obsequies OF GEN. 

CHARLES F. SMITH.CHARLES F. SMITH.
The obsequies of General SMITH took place yesterday afternoon, and were of an imposing character. Early in the day there were signs of bad weather, and many an anxious eye was cast upward. About the time for the commencement of the ceremonies, the clouds broke and gave token of a "blue and golden" day. A slight rain occurred during the progress of the procession, but not of sufficient consequence to mar the proceedings. The number of people lining the sidewalks and streets throughout the route of the procession was immense.
At precisely half-past two o’clock, the military having previously formed on Broad street, arrived at the south gate of Independence Square on Walnut street, the head of the column halting at Fifth street. The artillery was drawn up on Walnut street, between Fourth and Fifth. Immediately after the arrival of the military, the coffin was conveyed from the Hall to the south gate of the Square, followed by officers and other invited guests in the following order: -
Captain CHAPMAN BIDDLE’S Company A of artillery, the body-guard, was drawn up in a line in the centre of the Square, facing west. The body then emerged from the Hall, borne on the shoulders of eight policemen, attended on either side by the pall-bearers, among whom and in addition to the published list, were Gen. ROBERT ANDERSON, Dr. FINLEY, Col RUFF and Gen. PATTERSON, who followed directly in the rear of the coffin.
After the Pall-bearers came the Clergy, officers of the First Division P. V., officers of the Blue Reserves, officers of the Grey Reserve, officers of Volunteer Regiments, and officers of the Army and Navy. During the passage of this cortege through the Square, the Brigade Band, stationed on Walnut street opposite the gate of the Square, and under direction of Band Master A. BIRGFELD), played an impressive death march. The Body Guard, drawn up in the Square, presented sabres while the coffin and followers were passing, and then took position, marching by sections at the head of the line. In this order the procession marched through the gate, turning down Walnut street and halting at the right of the military column, which was at present arms. The arrangements in Independence Hall, and until the body was placed in the hearse, were under the direction of Col. P. C. ELLMAKER, of the First Regiment Grey Reserves; after the coffin had been placed in the hearse, the military were formed in column , left in front, and the procession proceeded the route previously agreed upon, in the following order: -
Body of Police, mounted and on foot, under the direction of Chief RUGGLES. 

General PLEASANTON and Staff.
Band.
Company A of the Cadets or SAUNDERS' Institute,
West Philadelphia.
Battalion American and German Rifles, Major GRAEF
commanding.
Band, led by Band master A. BIRGFELD.
Drum Corps.
Second Regiment Philadelphia Guard, Col. DARE,
Band.
Detachment from First Regiment Phila. Home
Guard, Lieutenant-Colonel SNOWDEN.
Keystone Artillery, Captain M. HASTINGS, with six
pieces artillery (Parrott guns).
Washington artillery, two companies, Captains
HALL and BAVINGTON.
Body Guard.
Carriages containing the Reverend Clergy and Pall
Bearers.
Undertaker - Mr. JOHN GOOD - and Assistants.
Hearse containing body, drawn by six black horses, led by grooms, with white plumes; top of hears ornamented with black and white feathers; coffin covered with American flag, and containing chapeau, epaulettes and sword of deceased. A body of police guarded the hearse.
The General’s horse, with accoutrements, led by a groom.
Officers of the Army and Navy.
Blue Reserves, Grey Reserves, Home Guard, Volunteers in service, etc.
Carriages containing relatives of deceased, Mayor of the city, Heads of Departments, Judges of the different Courts, Members of the Bar, Members of the Press, and citizens generally.

The cortege moved out Walnut to Twelfth, thence to Spring Garden, thence to Broad, thence to Girard avenue, thence to Ridge avenue, where the head of the procession halted. The Infantry were here drawn up on the south side of the street, and presented arms; the remainder of the procession proceeded out Ridge avenue to Laurel Hill Cemetery.

On arriving at the Cemetery the coffin was taken from the hearse, placed on a bier and conveyed within the gates, preceded by the body guard, with reversed arms, and the reverend clergy, aid fol. lowed by relatives, invited guests, &c. 
During the progress of the body to the grave, the band stationed in the Cemetery played a piece of music. The Rifle Battalion, which constituted, In connection with Capt. HASTINGS' company of Keystone Artillery, the firing party, were stationed near the grave, having arrived at the Cemetery before the rest of the procession. The Rifles were drawn up facing the east, and the Keystone Artillery, with four pieces planted in position, facing the north, and near the grave. The religious services were then pronounced by the Rev. Dr. DUCACHET. The ground was then cleared before the military, and the ceremonies were ended by the usual military salute being fired, consisting of three volleys of infantry and two rounds from four pieces of artillery, being the salute a Major-General is entitled to. During the march of the procession along Broad street, a salute of 100 guns was fired by the Mechanic Engine Company, In token of their respect for the deceased.
Minute guns were fired by the howitzer battery, Captain E. SPENCER MILLER, in number corresponding to the years of deceased from the lot adjoining the Academy of Music, Broad street.
The flags on all the public buildings and hotels, and on numerous private houses, were displayed at half-mast during the day.[2]
Grave Site in Laurel Hill Cemetery
General and Mrs. Smith are buried here
In June, the Special Committee asked for additional funds for the obsequies.
OBSEQUIES OF GENERAL SMITH.
The Special Committee upon the obsequies of Major-General CHARLES F. SMITH, reported that the actual expenses of the Committee amounted to $824.57. The expenses of the military, $445.16, it was thought, belonged to the Home Guards, and were passed to the Committee on Defence. As the Controller had refused to countersign one of the warrants, the Committee state [sic] that it became necessary to ask for a further appropriation of $269.73. An ordinance making such an appropriation was submitted and passed. [3]
General Smith's widow, Fanny Mactier Smith, died four years after her husband. The Philadelphia Inquirer published a notice on Monday, May 28, 1866.
Smith. - On Saturday, May 26, Fanny Mactier, widow of the late Major-General Charles F. Smith, United States Army.
The friends of the family are invited to attend her funeral, at St. Stephen's Church, this (Monday), at 5 o'clock P.M. [Baltimore and Washington papers will please copy.][4]
Rest in Peace "gallant gentleman and model soldier"


[1] "Honor to the Memory of General C. F. Smith," The Philadelphia Inquirer on Tuesday, May 2, 1862.
[2] "The Funeral Obsequies of Gen. Charles F. Smith," The Philadelphia Inquirer on Wednesday, May 7, 1862.
[3] "Obsequies of General Smith," The Philadelphia Inquirer on Friday, June 6, 1862.
[4] "Smith," The Philadelphia Inquirer on Monday, May 28, 1866.

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